Frequently Asked Questions


  1. What should I do in case of an emergency or mouth injury?
  2. Will my child be good?
  3. What should I expect for my child's first visit?
  4. Preparing for the first visit?
  5. How old should my child be for their first visit?
  6. What is the difference between a General Dental Office and our Pediatric Dental Office?
  7. What's Different About Us?
  8. Tips for expectant mothers
  9. First visit - how old and what to expect
  10. How to prepare your child for a dental visit - do's and dont's
  11. Why treat baby teeth
  12. Preparing your child for their treatment

1. What should I do in case of an emergency or mouth injury?

In case of injury, bleeding, pain, or infection, we will always see your child as soon as possible. If your child should injure a tooth, call the office immediately. We can decide whether immediate treatment is necessary. If a tooth is knocked out, place it in a cup of milk and call the office at once. Dr. Weiss uses an answering service so he may be reached at any time if an emergency occurs.

Call our office at (716) 689-0929 for dental emergencies.

2. Will my child be good?

A visit to the dentist can be an interesting and exciting time for a child. We are dedicated to your child's comfort and look forward to helping your child learn that his visits can be enjoyable. We recognize that children of different ages, experiences and conditions express themselves differently. Do not be upset if your child cries. Crying is a normal reaction to fear. Children may be afraid of anything new and strange. Kindness and trust are the greatest contributions for overcoming this fear. We know that no one knows your child as well as you do. We look forward to getting to know your child and helping you learn how we can best work together for your child's benefit.

3. What should I expect for my child's first visit?

Your child should visit the dentist by his/her first birthday. Your child's first visit will be a comprehensive 50 minute appointment. During that time, we will review your child's medical and dental history with you, introduce you and your child to our office and perform a complete exam. Your child's teeth will be cleaned and fluoride applied. The dental hygienist will review your child's home oral care, nutritional concerns, teething patterns and any significant oral habits. Dr. Weiss will examine the teeth, perform an oral cancer screening and check your child's bite. Our goal is to make this visit as easy for you and your child as possible. To accomplish this, we adopt a "tell-show-do" approach. This means we tell your child what we are going to do, show him/her using a mirror or model, and then we carefully and gently proceed with treatment.

4. Preparing for the first visit?

You may discuss the positive aspects of dentistry with your child, but avoid fear provoking words such as "hurt, drill, pull, or needle." Avoid statements like "the dentist won't hurt you," but rather , state "the dentist will be very gentle while working."

We prefer to work on a basis of trust. Parents should try to appear relaxed and at ease. Anxiety on your part will be sensed by your child.

5. How old should my child be for their first visit?

Because our concern is the prevention of dental problems, we now realize that it is necessary to see children and their parents very early. The first visit should be scheduled after the first teeth erupt, but definitely before the first birthday.

6. What is the difference between a General Dental Office and our Pediatric Dental Office?

Dr. Weiss has two additional years of specialty training in pediatric dentistry, in addition to dental school. We offer a "kid friendly" environment in our practice; kids are our only business, so naturally we are better at it!

7. What's Different About Us?

No two dental practices are exactly alike. Some offices may feel "clinical" while others feel comfortable and "like home." So what makes our office different from others?

- We pride ourselves on putting our patients' needs first and treating each child as if they were our own.

- We have genuine empathy and compassion for each patient.

- Education and prevention is the heart and soul of our practice.

- Visits are educational as well as fun!

- Each team member has specialized skills and talents

- We take the time to fully answer all questions

- We respect our patients' time

- We make a unique connection with each patient

- We offer individualized care

8. Tips for expectant mothers

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that dental caries is perhaps the most prevalent of infectious diseases in our nation's children. Dental caries is 5 times more common than asthma and 7 times more common than hay fever in children. More than 40% of children have tooth decay by the time they reach kindergarten. Decay of primary teeth can affect children's growth, lead to increased need for braces, and result in significant pain and potentially life-threatening infection or swelling.

Dental caries is the disease that causes cavities. It is a complicated, infectious, contagious disease, and it can have a significant impact on your child's general health as well as his oral health.

The disease begins in infancy when bacteria first start to inhabit the mouth. Many different kinds of bacteria make their home in the mouth. Some are good, and some are bad. The good ones compete for space with the bad ones. The bad ones love an acidic environment and therefore, produce cavity causing acids when exposed to sugars. The more acid they produce, the happier they are and the more they multiply, thus creating a vicious cycle of more and more bad bacteria. If they start overgrowing the good bacteria (like weeds in a garden) the dental caries process will begin.

The parent's mouth (or primary caregiver's mouth) serves as the host for the bacteria that the child will be infected with. If the parent has had a history of lots of cavities, either recently or as a child, it is likely that their mouths are inhabited by lots of these bad bacteria. It is also likely that, unless they are very careful, they will transmit these bacteria to their child, causing them to have lots of cavities as well.

What can a parent do to try not to transmit these bad bugs to their kids?

Keep their mouth as clean as possible during and following pregnancy and have cavities treated. This will reduce the number of bad bacteria in the mouth.

Optimize fluoride intake. Rinse with fluoride rinses as recommended by your dentist.

Chew xylitol based sugarless chewing gum (like Orbit or Koolerz), this can reduce the effects of the acids on the teeth.

Do not share eating utensils or toothbrushes with your child, this will transmit bacteria.

Do not place your child's pacifier in your mouth prior to placing in their mouth.

Studies show that if your child is not exposed to these acid producing bacteria until their 2nd birthday, the good bacteria will already have their "homes" set up and won't allow the bad bugs to establish themselves. With a little knowledge and a lot of effort, your child can grow up to be cavity free for a lifetime.

9. First visit - how old and what to expect

Ideally, it is best to take your child to the dentist before their first birthday. The earlier you begin, the better chance we have to prevent problems before they occur.

Our goals for the first visit are to:

Perform an oral health risk assessment to determine how likely your child is to develop cavities. That way, we can custom tailor a prevention program for your child.

Discuss feeding and dietary habits as they relate to oral health and overall health. We will also discuss the frequency of snacking, which can have an enormous effect on the decay rate. (Yes, juice is considered a snack.)

Clean your child's teeth in a non-threatening manner (either on your lap or in the dental chair, depending upon your child.)

Teach you proper oral hygiene techniques so you can keep your child's teeth clean at home.

Evaluate your child's fluoride needs to determine if supplementation is necessary. (May be done in consultation with their physician.)

Build your child's trust in the dentist and the office staff by letting him know that visits can be fun and we are his friend.

10. How to prepare your child for a dental visit - do's and dont's

You may discuss the positive aspects of dentistry with your child, but avoid fear-provoking words such as hurt, drill, pull, shot or needle. We use words such as “sleepy water” to numb the area, “special brush” for drill, and “wiggle” for pull. Avoid statements like “the dentist won’t hurt you,” but rather, state “the dentist will be very gentle while working.” At the time of the visit, we will prepare your child by explaining and showing him/her what will be done. Parents should try to appear relaxed and at ease. Anxiety on your part will be sensed by your child. A parent or legal guardian must accompany your child to this appointment.

Some first visit "DO'S":

Play "dentist" with your child at home. First, pretend that you're counting your child's teeth, then switch roles and let your child play "dentist."

Set a good example by brushing and flossing your own teeth daily.

Read your child a story about going to the dentist.

Talk about the visit in a positive, relaxed matter of fact way.

Make the dental appointment for a time when your child is well-rested. Mornings are usually best.

Let your child know that you visit the dentist regularly too.

Talk about the visit afterwards and remind them how much fun it was.

Some first visit "DON'TS":

Don't convey anxiety about the dental visit to your child. Anxiety on your part will be sensed by your child. They are very perceptive.

Don't worry if your child cries a little during the visit, since this is perfectly normal behavior for infants and young children in new situations.

Don't use negative words like: hurt, shot, needle, or drill around your child.

Avoid reassuring comments like "don't worry, the doctor won't hurt you." Comments like these tend to raise the child's anxiety level.

Don't use a visit to the dentist as punishment.

Don't allow scary stories to be told to your child about the dentist.

Be careful not to over do it. If you make too big of a deal about it, it will become a "big deal."

11. Why treat baby teeth

It is important that the baby (primary) teeth stay healthy until they are lost naturally. They serve many functions including:

They permit your child to chew food easily and comfortably.

They allow your child to speak well as teeth are needed for proper pronunciation of many sounds.

They hold space for the permanent teeth that will take their place (if they are lost early, space maintainers are necessary.)

They help to guide the eruption of the permanent teeth.

They are important for esthetics and keep you child's smile looking bright so your child can feel good about the way they look.

Cavities grow very quickly in primary teeth as the enamel is very thin (compared to permanent teeth). If cavities do arise, it is important to take care of them quickly. This way they can be treated in the most conservative manner possible. If cavities get large, they are much more difficult to restore and will become painful for the child. Untreated decay on any tooth, permanent or primary, can lead to serious infections (abscess) requiring hospitalization and extraction of the involved tooth. If primary teeth are lost early due to infection, a space maintainer will be required to hold the space for the permanent replacement.

12. Preparing your child for their treatment

You may discuss the positive aspects of dentistry with your child, but avoid fear-provoking words such as “hurt, drill, pull, shot or needle.” We use words such as “sleepy water” to numb the area, “special brush” for drill, and “wiggle” for pull. Avoid statements like “the dentist won’t hurt you,” but rather state, “the dentist will be very gentle while working.” At the time of the visit, we will prepare your child by explaining and showing them what will be done. Parents should try to appear relaxed and at ease. Anxiety on your part will be sensed by your child. *A parent or legal guardian must accompany your child at every operative appointment.

dental information

practice hours

Monday8:30am - 2:30pm
Tuesday12:30pm - 5:30pm
Wednesday8:00am - 5:00pm
Thursday8:00am - 5:00pm
Friday8:00am - 2:30pm